Running

Running or jogging, which is simply running at a slower pace, is one of the most effective, time efficient workouts around. Getting started and sticking with a running program is not difficult once you know what to do and how to do it.
To get started check with your doctor to determine if running is the best exercise for you. If you have heart, orthopedic or other physical concerns, brisk walking may be a better option. Wear good quality, proper fitting running shoes. Poorly fitting or worn running shoes can result in shin splints, sore knees and blisters. Wear comfortable clothes that will keep you from overheating in summer and warm and dry in winter. Avoid heavy sweat suits that hold perspiration and chafe your thighs as you run. Always protect yourself with a hat and sunglasses on sunny days. Run on solid, shock absorbing surfaces. Indoor tracks, asphalt and level dirt surfaces are the best. Avoid solid concrete surfaces such as sidewalks. Ensure that there is water available throughout your run.
If you run outdoors, invest in a water backpack or waist-belt to comfortably carry your water. Be sure that where you run is safe and well lit. Run smart by carrying identification and change for a pay telephone in your pocket or fanny pack in case of an accident or emergency. Joanne always carries taxi fare too, just in case.

Technique

  • Lean forward, from the hips not the waist, about ten degrees.
  • Keep your head level and look straight down the road, not down at your feet.
  • Hold your arms at a 90-degree angle and pump them forward and back like a pendulum. Always remember to drive the elbows backward. Arms and hands should remain relaxed.
  • Run with a rolling heel-toe motion. Strike the ground with the heel first, roll through the mid-sole onto the ball of the foot, and then push off with the toes.
  • Keep your shoulders down and relaxed.
  • Try not to take strides that are too big, as it can cause you to lose your balance, put undue stress on your joints and make you work harder than you really have to.
  • Take time to warm up and cool down. Plan to run the first and last five minutes at a slow, easy pace. Perform stretches for the calves, hamstrings; quadriceps and back muscles after you cool down (refer to Cool Down in this section).
  • Never increase your mileage by more than 10% per week. Many runners are forced to stop training when they do too much, too soon.
  • New runners should expect to feel some mild muscle soreness a day or two after their workouts. If you feel pain during or after your run, take time off and re-evaluate your situation.

Schedule

Week Time (minutes) Intensity (always within your target heart rate zone)
1 20 Walk
2 22 Walk
3 22 Alternate between 1 min. jog and 5 min. walk
4 24 Same as Week 3
5 24 Alternate between 1 min. jog and 4 min. walk
6 26 Same as Week 5
7 26 Alternate between 1 min. jog and 3 min. walk
8 28 Same as Week 5
9 28 Alternate between 1 min. jog and 2 min. walk
10 30 Same as Week 9
11 30 Alternate between 1 min. jog and 1 min. walk
12 30 Gradually progress to continuous jogging. Over time, gradually increase your pace, still staying within your target heart rate zone.

Tips

  • Take time to warm up and cool down. Plan to run the first and last five minutes at a slow, easy pace. Perform stretches for the calves, hamstrings, quadriceps and back muscles after you cool down (refer to Cool Down in this section).
  • Never increase your mileage by more than 10% per week. Many runners are forced to stop training when they do too much, too soon.
  • New runners should expect to feel some mild muscle soreness a day or two after their workouts. If you feel pain during or after your run, take time off and re-evaluate your situation.

Elliptical

An elliptical trainer is a stationary exercise machine used to simulate walking or running without causing pressure to the joints, which decreases the risk of impact injuries. Elliptical trainers offer a non-impact cardiovascular workout that can vary from light to high intensity based on the resistance preference set by the user. Most elliptical trainers work the user’s upper and lower body.

When purchasing an Elliptical machine look for an adjustable incline and varying levels of resistance. The incline option is sure to give you increased aerobic activity and the future opportunity to challenge yourself in new and different ways. Your machine should offer a wide range of incline and resistance levels to ensure that you have the maximum array of potential workout programs. When you change incline levels or resistance levels throughout the workout, the alteration should be smooth and non-jarring so that you can change inclines any time you wish, while still enjoying a great workout experience.

Treadmill Running

We believe that a treadmill is the best piece of aerobic or cardio equipment you can purchase. Walking is a natural movement and a treadmill allows people at any fitness level to exercise, from cardiac patients, pregnant women, beginners to the elite athlete. As fitness improves you can begin to jog or run to increase the intensity of your workout or you may choose to incorporate a more difficult incline/decline into your walking program. It’s important that you don’t compromise on price and certain features when it comes to buying a treadmill. This is an investment and you’ll want it to last and deliver on performance. Consider these key points when buying a motorized treadmill:

  • All major joints should be welded together. The more bolted joints, the less stable it will become over time as the bolts loosen.
  • The track should be long enough for a full stride. About 50 inches is plenty.
  • The deck should be as maintenance-free as possible. A deck requiring lubrication with silicon every month can be messy and you may forget, damaging the belt.
  • A cotton weave belt rolls more smoothly than a nylon belt. A nylon belt may also slip.
  • A three horsepower motor that can operate between 0.5 mph to 10 mph is appropriate for beginners and intermediate exercisers. A higher end treadmill could offer a 4.25 horsepower motor. It’s like comparing a V6 engine to a V8.
  • Automatic incline from 0% to 12% adjusts the elevation of the treadmill. You can easily increase the intensity level of your workout without increasing the speed. A decline feature is also available on the higher priced, industrial treadmills. This feature simulates walking or running downhill, adds more variety to your workouts and works the muscles in your legs and buttocks differently.
  • Computerized programs help keep you motivated during your workout by adding different incline and intensity levels. However, depending upon your fitness level you may not need all the programs which will affect the price of a treadmill.
  • Is the treadmill fully folding to save on space when it’s not in use?
  • Look for safety features such as automatic shut off if you need to get off the treadmill immediately, safety latches to ensure that the folding treadmill will not accidentally lower and handlebars should you need help keeping your balance.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.